So many people design in a vacuum without any feedback from the group that’s going to be using the product. Design is for your customers, not for the manager in the room. This is why sudden redesigns fail (MySpace, Digg, stumbleupon). They were built incrementally with their users, and the redesigns were not. Just because something looks nice doesn’t mean it’s usable. Design is what works. Notecard from 2007. #timehop #design


So many people design in a vacuum without any feedback from the group that’s going to be using the product. Design is for your customers, not for the manager in the room. This is why sudden redesigns fail (MySpace, Digg, stumbleupon). They were built incrementally with their users, and the redesigns were not. Just because something looks nice doesn’t mean it’s usable. Design is what works.
Notecard from 2007. #timehop #design

Designing for Privacy in Mobile and Web Apps at Interaction ’14 in Amsterdam

Last week I spoke at Interaction ’14 in Amsterdam, a conference on interaction design and user experience. The conference was fantastic. There were a lot of speakers from many different fields tangental to interaction design, including cartoonist Scott McCloud and communication professor Klaus Krippendorff. These different perspectives ended up adding a lot to my talk as I developed it over the course of the conference. My topic was designing for privacy in mobile and web apps. I wanted to give a series of guidelines, some understanding of how privacy is socially constructed, and then provide a future perspective on how we can own our own data.

Practice privacy by design, not privacy by disaster!

Almost every application requires some gathering of personal data today. Where that data is stored, who has access to it, and what is done with that data later on is becoming increasingly important as more and more of our data lives online today. Privacy disasters are costly and can be devastating to a company. UX designers and developers need to have a framework for protecting user data, communicating it to users, and making sure that the entire process is smoothly handled.

This talk covers best practices for designing web and mobile apps with the privacy of individual users in mind. Privacy has been an even bigger issue with location-based apps, and we ran into it head-first when we began work on Geoloqi (now part of Esri). Designing an interface that made one’s personal empowering instead of creepy was our goal. The stories from our design decisions with our application will also be included in this talk.

Talk Slides

What was your favorite talk at Interaction Conf?

The 6th Portland Data Visualization Group – Wed, October 19, 2011 from 6:30–8:30pm at Collective Agency!

It’s time for another Portland Data Visualization Meetup! We’ll have three to four main presentations and networking time. The last one was in February, and we’re overdue for the next one!

We usually have some conversation and networking, so feel free to bring business cards and/or let people know if you’re hiring. We won’t have a food or drink sponsor for this meeting, so feel free to bring your own snacks and things to eat! (if you’d like to sponsor, see the section at the end of this post).

This time, Collective Agency will graciously host us as their cozy coworking space (see below for the address and entrance instructions). For best results, please arrive a little before 6:30 Pm.

Thanks to our Sponsor Second Story!

Fantastic Portland company Second Story will be the sponsor of this month’s Data Viz group! You can check out their amazing work online at SecondStory.com.

Second Story will be bringing food and drinks for all of you to enjoy. We’ll thank them more on the day of the event!

Speakers for Data Viz #6

1. Dino Citraro of Periscopic will be presenting some new visualization work.

2. Rocket Scientist Nathan Bergey will be talking about his open source tool chain (mostly python and bender) for his recent rocket data viz [video link], and will bring an ISS-Notify (an awesome lamp that blinks when the international space station goes over your current position)!

3. Kevin Lynagh will give a talk on Mike Bostock’s D3 library: http://mbostock.github.com/d3/, a declarative way to map data to DOM elements, so you can very easily make complex visualizations for the web with what you already know: HTML, SVG, and CSS!

4. Charlie Loyd will give a talk on his self-GPS-tracking.

5. Aaron Parecki will show some data viz from a group in Norway that used Geoloqi to track a high altitude balloon 17km into the air!

Who Should Go?

Portland Data Viz Group is open to everyone interested in or working in the field of data visualization. This means designers, programmers, information architects, data miners, anthropologists, ect. We usually attract around 20-30 people, and you’re welcome to bring guests, food and drinks to the event.

Location and Time

Wednesday, October 19, 2011 from 6:30–8:30pm. RSVP on Plancast

Where?

Collective Agency
322 NW Sixth Ave (between Everett and Flanders)
Suite 200
Portland, Oregon 97209
(Google Map)

Entrance instructions: Buzz “200″ when you arrive. The phone will ring once or twice, then you’ll be buzzed up. Come on in: we’ll be on the second floor. Walk on back to the main loft and you’ll be welcomed in!

Google Group

If you’re interested in getting updates for for future meetings, simply join the the pdx-visualization Google Group! As the name implies, it is a group for Portland-area people interested in languages and techniques for visualization of data. http://groups.google.com/group/pdx-visualization.